Anonymous asked:

I want to get a rabbit but I am concerned about the odour,do they have a strong odour?

Bunnies themselves are remarkably odor free! If proper attention is paid to cleaning their cage and litter boxes, they won’t smell. However… Proper cleaning takes time and energy!!!!! Laela’s litter boxes are cleaned (completely dumped out and scrubbed) every two days. This attention to cleaning is really important in order to maintain rabbit health and encourage good litter habits.

Bunnies also need special litter (cat litter and wood chips cannot be used!). We get Laela Carefresh pet bedding (we call it “fluff” ๐Ÿ˜‚)

varenyki asked:

I saw you said you have a bed ramp. Does your cutie use it much?

She does!!!! Every day. She can hop up on the bed from the ground, but getting down is a lot harder! Since we got the ramp, she always chooses to use that versus leaping all the way up on her own.

A year ago I snapped this photo of Laela being the BRAVEST bunny. She broke her jaw in a freak accident. Surgery wasn’t an option because of the placement of the break and because of the possibility of her losing her whole lower jaw. Our vet consulted with experts in the US and Europe about best options and they agreed that we should wait it out and hope for the best. It was such a scary time - she couldn’t chew and drinking was difficult. We had to force feed her, take her to the vet for sub-dermal saline every 1-2 days, and learn to give her at-home injections. She was such a fighter!!!! The first month was the hardest. She slowly started eating again. It took three and a half months for her jaw to heal completely. The whole time she remained her spunky, hard-headed bunny self. I think a lot about how lucky we are to have her here, happy and healthy. Always thankful for her daily cuddles and being woken up by her morning kisses๐Ÿ’˜

A year ago I snapped this photo of Laela being the BRAVEST bunny. She broke her jaw in a freak accident. Surgery wasn’t an option because of the placement of the break and because of the possibility of her losing her whole lower jaw. Our vet consulted with experts in the US and Europe about best options and they agreed that we should wait it out and hope for the best. It was such a scary time - she couldn’t chew and drinking was difficult. We had to force feed her, take her to the vet for sub-dermal saline every 1-2 days, and learn to give her at-home injections. She was such a fighter!!!! The first month was the hardest. She slowly started eating again. It took three and a half months for her jaw to heal completely. The whole time she remained her spunky, hard-headed bunny self. I think a lot about how lucky we are to have her here, happy and healthy. Always thankful for her daily cuddles and being woken up by her morning kisses๐Ÿ’˜